Tag Archives: love

FINDING OLD MAN PULLIAM’S HORSE–AND CHARITY

“It was written when charity was a virtue and not an organization.” My brother’s take on the King James version of I Corinthians 13, what many call “The Love Chapter.”

How can we keep Paul’s true meaning of charity as a virtue as we shop, worship, bake?  Or search for our neighbors’ lost animals?

Maybe my mom had the right idea over 80 years ago:

“Baby, you know Old Man Pulliam’s saddle horse has been missing for several days. After breakfast, why don’t we fix a lunch to take along, saddle our horses and spend our day riding to see if we can find that horse? I know the Pulliams are away, but he wouldn’t be able to go hunt the horse if he were home.”

This daughter, my now 99-year-old mom, had no tree with gifts piled under it. Her mother had no turkey in the oven.

They lived in a simple homesteader’s shack. The people hoped someday to eke out a decent living from the few cows their land in this barren area of New Mexico would feed.

“We had no modern conveniences—and little communication with the outside world. We did have a post office where we got our mail on Tuesdays and Saturdays if we wanted to ride four miles on horseback.”

I love to hear her tell this story as if it happened yesterday.

“Daddy and I were alone in our little adobe house that night. I guess the average just-out-of-high-school girl would have dreamed of lights inside and out. She would hope for that wool sweater she’d seen in the Sears and Roebuck Catalog. These thoughts didn’t bother me. This Christmas Eve I had chosen to remain at home with Daddy, when my mother and my brother left to go about fifty miles away to spend the night and the holiday at an older brother’s home.”

With lunch on their saddles, they were ready to ride. This wasn’t just any lunch. Only my grandmother’s home-cured ham, homemade bread and plain cake chock full of nuts would do for Christmas day.

“The day was not stormy, but cold enough we appreciated heavy coats. I was proud to ride beside my cowboy father, for who knows how many miles, until we finally found the horse. I was pleased to know that my dad was willing to consider the simple need of an elderly neighbor.”

I wish I’d had the privilege of knowing this grandfather. He knew how to do Christmas–and Charity.

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

DON’T BE A GONG

ME, A GONG?

ME, A GONG?

I Corinthians 13:1 tells us what we are without love.  One is a resounding gong.   Surely those sweet grandbabies of mine aren’t gongs.  Following is a story from Ebenezer and Ninety-Eight Friends

Am I a Gong?

            Chopsticks!  I hate hearing those kids play chopsticks on the piano!  Over and over they play it because they don’t know any other music.  It’s not a bad tune.  When you play both parts, it even has a little harmony to it.  It’s just that they play it again and again as if everyone were enjoying a fine performance. 

            This is what I think of when I read in I Corinthians 13.  If we don’t have love, we’re playing chopsticks over and over again—and thinking everyone is enjoying it.  We’re like a “resounding gong or a clanging cymbal.”  

We have a set of presently unused percussion instruments at our church.  After the service, children bang on them until told to stop. 

            Do we go about our measured, repetitious lives like a sounding gong—making a lot of noise and motions, but with not much lasting results?  We may even irritate a few onlookers along the way.

            The Bible says we’re nothing if we don’t have the gift of love—even if we have mountain-moving faith.  If we give our possessions and even our bodies to be burned and we don’t practice love, we gain nothing. 

            Love is kind.  Am I kind to those who are not kind back?  Even sinners know how to be nice to people who are nice to them.  (Luke 6:32)

            Love doesn’t boast.  I can’t imagine a loving boaster.  It’s an oxymoron.  Rude and loving don’t go together, either.  Can you picture loving the guy you’re cutting off in traffic? 

            “You owe me.  I have my rights.”  Try to love a person while saying those words to him.  It’s harder than rubbing your head and patting your tummy.

            A loving person wants the other guy to succeed.  I like being that other guy.  But if we really want to succeed, we’ll be the cheerleader for so many around us who need more than a piercing sound. 

            Uh-oh.  Paul says in verse 4, love is patient.  I guess I’d better go back and apologize to those young chopstick players and gong resounders and clanging cymbalists.  I don’t want to be a gong.   

…………………………………………………………………………………….

Don’t be a gong.  Go out and buy  a copy of Ebenezer and Ninety-Eight Friends.  But I’ll be your friend even if you don’t.

Blessings!

2 Comments

Filed under Devotional thought, Ebenezer and Ninety-Eight Friends

WHAT WONDROUS LOVE

What wondrous love is this, O my soul, O my soul!  *What wondrous love is this, O my soul!  *What wondrous love is this that caused the Lord of bliss * To bear the dreadful curse for my soul, for my soul, *To bear the dreadful curse for my soul. 

Anyone who is hung on a tree is under God’s curse.  Deuteronomy 21:23

Leave a comment

Filed under Easter Week